Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize 2019

Real-time tracking for live analyses - Fast as a puck, hard as ice hockey

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The winners of the Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize from the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS (f.l.t.r.): Norbert Franke, Thomas von der Grün and Thomas Pellkofer from jogmo world corp.

©  Foto: Fraunhofer / Piotr Banczerowski
 

Winners of the Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize 2019:


Thomas von der Grün, Fraunhofer IIS
Norbert Franke, Fraunhofer IIS

Thomas Pellkofer, jogmo world corp.

 

How is the defense formation reacting to the line of attackers? How fast does the puck whizz over the ice? Analyses and game evaluations are an integral part of sports broadcasts. Until now, however, such game analyses could only be carried out after a game play.

Thomas von der Grün and Norbert Franke from the Fraunhofer Institute for Inte­grated Circuits IIS and Thomas Pellkofer from the jogmo world corp. and their approximately 20-strong research team have developed a localization technology that is specially adapted to the dynamic pace of ice hockey and is based on the measured transit times of radio signals. For the first time ever, it enables a variety of game analyses to be performed and displayed in real time. The system’s distin­guishing feature is its high measuring rate, with the position of the puck being measured 2000 times per second and the location of each player being determined 200 times per second.

This technology was used publicly for the first time during the hockey games at the 2019 Honda NHL All-Star Weekend in San José, USA. The player and puck data were analyzed in real time and prepared for the viewers − an absolute novelty.

 

Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize

Since 1978, the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft has annually awarded prizes for outstanding scientific achievements by its employees that have system relevance and a poten­tial to directly and decisively help solve societal challenges and safeguard the future of Germany as a business location. More than 300 researchers have won the award to date. This year, four prizes are awarded, each worth 50,000 euros.