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  • Financial results 2015 / 2016

    Fraunhofer continues to grow

    Research News / 11.5.2016

    The Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft presented its financial statements for 2015 at the annual meeting in Essen. The total business volume of Europe’s largest applied-research organization increased by three percent compared with the previous year to €2.115 billion. Industrial revenue grew by four percent to €641 million, boosted in particular by the expansion of Fraunhofer’s international activities.

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  • Fraunhofer General Assembly Meeting in Essen / 2016

    Sustainable growth – both financial and structural

    Research News / 11.5.2016

    Sustainable growth – both financial and structural
    © Photo Ines Escherich/Fraunhofer

    At the Fraunhofer General Assembly Meeting in Essen President Prof. Reimund Neugebauer presented the strategy of the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft.

    Last year, the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft achieved more than 2.1 billion euros in business volume – an impressive new record. In line with this strong performance, Fraunhofer pushed ahead with its strategy to expand its scope: the Senate decided to establish a Fraunhofer Research Institution for Casting, Composite and Processing Technology IGCV. The expansion of Fraunhofer High Performance Centers is also continuing. For instance, the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia is supporting three new High Performance Centers to the tune of some eight million euros.

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  • Tailor-Made Radiation Therapy

    Research News - Special Issue / 10.5.2016

    By developing an interactive and easy-to-use software product, Dr. Philipp Süss, Prof. Dr. Karl-Heinz Küfer, Dr. Katrin Teichert, Dr. Michael Bortz and Dr. Alexander Scherrer (from the left) have helped improve cancer patients‘ chances of recovery.
    © Photo Dirk Mahler/Fraunhofer

    By developing an interactive and easy-to-use software product, Dr. Philipp Süss, Prof. Dr. Karl-Heinz Küfer, Dr. Katrin Teichert, Dr. Michael Bortz and Dr. Alexander Scherrer (from the left) have helped improve cancer patients‘ chances of recovery.

    Radiation therapy is one of the most essential elements in cancer treatment. But properly planning radiation therapy is a highly complex task. Fraunhofer mathematicians have joined an alliance with medical physicists and physicians to improve the therapy planning process. In doing so they have helped improve patient‘s chances of recovery.

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  • Digital Radio for the World

    Research News - Special Issue / 10.5.2016

    In order to help digital radio make a worldwide market breakthrough, Alexander Zink, Martin Speitel and Max Neuendorf (from the left) developed technologies for the entire broadcast chain.
    © Photo Dirk Mahler/Fraunhofer

    In order to help digital radio make a worldwide market breakthrough, Alexander Zink, Martin Speitel and Max Neuendorf (from the left) developed technologies for the entire broadcast chain.

    Digital radio makes spherics and crackling interference in radio broadcast a thing of the past. New technologies from Fraunhofer IIS make it possible for digital radio to replace analogue short and medium wave broadcasting around the world. Even local FM transmissions are being converted to digital. As a result, Digital radio listeners benefit from clear reception, a wider range of programming, and additional information via data services without having to pay for a costly Internet connection.

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  • Little Projectors that Pack a Big Punch

    Research News - Special Issue / 10.5.2016

    The array projector developed by Peter Dannberg, Peter Schreiber (from the left) and Marcel Sieler (not shown) projects an extremely bright image in spite of its minimal size.
    © Photo Dirk Mahler/Fraunhofer

    The array projector developed by Peter Dannberg, Peter Schreiber (from the left) and Marcel Sieler (not shown) projects an extremely bright image in spite of its minimal size.

    An image projected on a slanted or curved surface appears distorted and can appear out of focus in some areas. A high-intensity mini-projector about the size of a Euro cent coin from the Fraunhofer IOF in Jena, Germany can now correct for this effect. The projector‘s secret: Hundreds on tiny lenses inspired by the model of an insect‘s compound eye.

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  • Changes in Solar Cell Technology

    Research News - Special Issue / 10.5.2016

    Dr. Jan Nekarda and Dr.-Ing. Ralf Preu (from the left) developed the Laser Fired Contact process for series manufacturing of highly efficient PERC solar cells.
    © Photo Dirk Mahler/Fraunhofer

    Dr. Jan Nekarda and Dr.-Ing. Ralf Preu (from the left) developed the Laser Fired Contact process for series manufacturing of highly efficient PERC solar cells.

    A laser-based manufacturing process from the Fraunhofer ISE in Freiburg, Germany is revolutionizing the photovoltaics market. For the first time point-contacted solar cells can be manufactured in series. Several million cells with significantly higher efficiency levels are already on the market.

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  • Smart Harvesters / 2016

    Automatically Harvesting Cauliflower

    Research News / 28.4.2016

    The “Spargelpanther”, developed in a previous project, will also be harvesting cauliflower and leaf lettuce in the future.
    © Photo ai-solution GmbH

    The “Spargelpanther”, developed in a previous project, will also be harvesting cauliflower and leaf lettuce in the future.

    Machines that harvest vegetables pick everything at once – even unripe heads when harvesting cauliflower. This is why human helpers often perform this tedious job. In the future, a machine will make selective harvesting possible fully automatically. Fraunhofer researchers are developing this smart harvester together with industry partners.

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  • Project NanoUmwelt / 2016

    Detecting minute nano amounts in environmental samples

    Research News / 28.4.2016

    Detail of a microscopic image of a human lipid cell: untreated at the top, treated with gold nanoparticles at the bottom. The particles accumulate in the lipid droplets of the cell.
    © Photo Fraunhofer IBMT

    Detail of a microscopic image of a human lipid cell: untreated at the top, treated with gold nanoparticles at the bottom. The particles accumulate in the lipid droplets of the cell.

    It is still unclear what the impact is on humans, animals and plants of synthetic nanomaterials released into the environment or used in products. It’s very difficult to detect these nanomaterials in the environment since the concentrations are so low and the particles so small. Now the partners in the NanoUmwelt project have developed a method that is capable of identifying even minute amounts of nanomaterials in environmental samples.

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  • Consumer safety / 2016

    Making sure that packaging is properly sealed

    Research News / 28.4.2016

    Sealing bars fitted with thin-film sensors (left). White light interferometer image of a measuring point with conducting tracks approx. 250 nm thick and 600 μm wide (right).
    © Photo Fraunhofer IWM

    Sealing bars fitted with thin-film sensors (left). White light interferometer image of a measuring point with conducting tracks approx. 250 nm thick and 600 μm wide (right).

    If food packaging or drug packaging is not properly sealed when the customer buys the product, it reflects poorly on the manufacturer. In the future, a thin-film temperature sensor will allow companies to carry out fast and reliable inline detection and rejection of packaging which has been incorrectly sealed.

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  • Following the automotive industry’s lead / 2016

    Bringing medical products to market faster

    Research News / 28.4.2016

    Exhibit to demonstrate the application potential of the hardware-in-the-loop method using the example of a heart assist pump.
    © Photo Fraunhofer IPA

    Exhibit to demonstrate the application potential of the hardware-in-the-loop method using the example of a heart assist pump.

    Developing medical devices takes a lot of time: large parts of the control systems can be designed and tested only once the hardware is ready. Using the hardware-in-the-loop method, which Fraunhofer researchers have transferred from automotive engineering to medical products, development times and costs can be slashed by up to 50 percent.

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