Videos 2021

Research visualized

The Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft produces films about current research topics.
 

Legal notice

For licensing reasons, publishing or distributing the video material provided here – whether on TV, on video platforms or through reproduction on Blu-ray/DVD – is not permitted without Fraunhofer’s prior agreement.

#WeKnowHow

Ingenuity is our country’s most important raw material. It enables the efficient and sustainable transfer of scientific knowledge into commercial use. This transfer is the backbone of our innovation system. The coronavirus pandemic has changed our world.  But change brings opportunities. We must gain more sovereignty in key technology areas. From AI – to cybersecurity – to medicine — and transform our economy towards sustainable value creation. We are focusing on strategic research fields — in view of their cross-industry impact and the markets of tomorrow. Now we have the opportunity to become even more resilient than before the crisis. And the opportunity to not only maintain, but also deepen our skills and expertise through a targeted push in innovation. Freedom of action and choice are our goals in order to maintain our position as one of the world’s top players in the most important technology fields. Together, we can emerge from the crisis stronger — and better prepared for future challenges. Let us now set the right course — in harmony with economics and ecology. Fraunhofer. WeKnowHow.

Internet of Things: Efficient and robust networking

Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize 2021

Privacy warning

With the click on the play button an external video from wwww.youtube.com is loaded and started. Your data is possible transferred and stored to third party. Do not start the video if you disagree. Find more about the youtube privacy statement under the following link: http://www.youtube.com/t/privacy_at_youtube

Winners of the Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize for the newly developed, ready-for-market mioty® wireless transmission system: Prof. Michael Schlicht, Josef Bernhard and Dr. Gerd Kilian (from left to right).

The networking of objects in the Internet of Things — or IoT for short — is becoming increasingly important, and demand for connected IoT devices is growing rapidly everywhere, from consumers to Industry 4.0. But until now, no suitable and reliable method of communication has been available for transferring many thousands of data packages at the same time. A team of researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS in Erlangen/Nuernberg has now overcome this challenge with the newly developed, ready-for-market mioty® wireless low-power wide-area transmission system — and has been awarded the Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize for its efforts.

 

Microchips: Smaller, more powerful and unrivaled

Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize 2021

Privacy warning

With the click on the play button an external video from wwww.youtube.com is loaded and started. Your data is possible transferred and stored to third party. Do not start the video if you disagree. Find more about the youtube privacy statement under the following link: http://www.youtube.com/t/privacy_at_youtube

Awarded the Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize for developing a technology for further miniaturization of microchips that is unrivaled around the world: Michael Kampmann, Martin Witt and Dr. Jacqueline Atanelov (from left to right).

The evolution of microchips seemed to have reached its limits, as far as their size is concerned. Nevertheless, it is crucial that these small components become even smaller and more powerful so that many devices — including smartphones — can be developed even further. The Fraunhofer Institute for Silicon Technology ISIT in Itzehoe and IMS Nanofabrication GmbH have now succeeded in pushing the existing boundaries when it comes to MEMS processing of a microsystem switching element which is at the core of an electron beam mask writer — a crucial piece of equipment in the production of the latest generation of microchips. Their efforts have earned them the 2021 Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize.

Redox flow batteries: A step toward the mass market

Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize 2021

Privacy warning

With the click on the play button an external video from wwww.youtube.com is loaded and started. Your data is possible transferred and stored to third party. Do not start the video if you disagree. Find more about the youtube privacy statement under the following link: http://www.youtube.com/t/privacy_at_youtube

80 percent lighter, only half the size and much more cost-effective. Thanks to their invention, redox flow batteries have moved an important step closer to the mass market: Prof. Christian Doetsch, Lukas Kopietz and Dr. Thorsten Seipp (from left to right).

Redox flow batteries are perfect for storing large quantities of renewable energy, but they have always been too expensive for the mass market. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety and Energy Technology UMSICHT have now completely redesigned the heart of a redox flow battery — the stack — and have brought about a massive reduction in material usage and costs. Their efforts have earned them the Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize.

Vaccine production: Inactivating pathogens using low-energy electrons

Fraunhofer Prize for “Human- and Environment-Centered Technology” 2021

Privacy warning

With the click on the play button an external video from wwww.youtube.com is loaded and started. Your data is possible transferred and stored to third party. Do not start the video if you disagree. Find more about the youtube privacy statement under the following link: http://www.youtube.com/t/privacy_at_youtube

Awarded the Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize for developing a vaccine production process that is fast-er, more efficient and more environmentally friendly: Dr. Sebastian Ulbert, Dr. Jasmin Fertey, Frank-Holm Rögner and Martin Thoma (from left to right).

Vaccines are currently a great source of hope for many people, as it is believed they will help to protect society against COVID-19 and pave the way back to a normal life. The current focus is clearly on coronavirus — but vaccines are also fundamental to combating other pathogens. A team of researchers from three Fraunhofer Institutes has now developed a method of producing vaccines that is faster, more efficient and more environmentally friendly than the conventional production process — and their efforts have earned them the Fraunhofer Prize for “Human- and Environment-Centered Technology”.